A Gender-Equitable Recovery Requires Saving the States

As we near the end of July, it is clear our overlapping health and economic crises show no sign of abating—in fact, they are on the verge of becoming much worse. Congress and the president now face crucial and urgent choices in averting a depression and creating a recovery that addresses the pain that has been disproportionately exacted on women.

Accelerating Education, Slowing Mobility

Economic mobility is little more than a myth for most people who grow up in families with low incomes. A child born in poverty in the early 1980s had single-digit chances of having a high income as an adult. If we want to simply raise incomes from one generation to the next, we’re failing. Nearly all Americans born in 1940 had incomes higher than their parents’ by the time they reached the same age, but today, only half of adults born in 1980 make more than their parents did.

A cynical way to make poor people disappear

The Trump administration has proposed a change in the way the federal government measures poverty. On the surface, this proposal may appear to be an innocuous, technical adjustment. It’s not. Instead, this change would dramatically reduce the number of people who qualify for vital basic assistance programs, including Medicaid, children’s health care and food assistance.

Ensuring the Youth Opportunity Guarantee Works for Undocumented Youth

Undocumented youth are an integral part of the United States. Regardless of documentation status, immigrants contribute to our country—supporting their families, serving their communities, and contributing to local, state and national economies. However, the nearly 2.1 million undocumented youth under the age of 24 are often left out of opportunities and programs, and therefore face uncertainty about their job prospects and futures.