ISABELLA CAMACHO-CRAFT

Communications & Policy Associate

Isabella Camacho-Craft is the Communications & Policy Associate at the Economic Security & Opportunity Initiative at the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality. Isabella helps lead the center’s external relations and communications. She also conducts research and drafts reports, briefs, fact sheets, and other research products on various issues, including federal anti-poverty programs.

Previously, Isabella worked at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, where she worked with state-based advocates to develop communications and field campaigns to protect and strengthen health care and food assistance for low-income families. She also worked at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, where she worked on communications and web development.

Isabella is an M.P.P. candidate at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University and received her B.A. in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of California, Berkeley.

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ReportJobs & Educationareeba-haideradiam-tesfaselassiesiddhartha-anejasierra-wilson

A Growing Problem: How Market Power in Agriculture Fuels Racial & Economic Inequality

Market power and corporate consolidation have increased in recent decades, concentrating economic and political power among fewer corporations across the country. This report examines the implications of market power in the agricultural sector–particularly in crop production, animal production, and animal slaughtering. Market power, deeply intertwined with economic inequality and structural racism, contributes to low pay, dangerous working conditions, and other harms to workers of color.

Three meatpacking workers
ReportDemocracyJobs & Educationcara-brumfieldadiam-tesfaselassiechris-gearysiddhartha-aneja

Concentrated Power, Concentrated Harm: Market Power’s Role in Creating & Amplifying Racial & Economic Inequality

Market power exists when one or more companies can profitably set prices for goods, services, and wages; and determine the quality, accessibility, and availability of goods and services. Market power, intertwined with deeply entrenched structural racism and class inequality, can have life-or-death consequences. This report explores the real-world impact of market power on the lives of people of color and people with low incomes–as workers, consumers, and entrepreneurs–their communities, and society at large. The research shows that market power contributes to economic insecurity and hardship in low-income communities and communities of color, including by driving down wages and benefits; limiting and controlling the availability of goods, services, and jobs; and undermining American prosperity and democracy.

A person with short hair wearing a safety helmet and safety vest walks down an aisle with shelves in a warehouse. View from behind.
BriefDemocracyjae-june-leecara-brumfieldirma-sandoval

Administrative Data in the 2020 Census: Considerations for Civil Rights Groups

Since its inception at the turn of the 20th century, the Census Bureau has pioneered cutting edge methods and technologies to meet the vast and increasingly complex challenge of counting everyone in the United States. Civil rights organizations often work with the Census Bureau to ensure that innovations advance the accuracy and fairness of the decennial census. This brief focuses on one of the most significant areas of innovation over the past century: the use of “administrative data'' (AD). AD are typically collected by government agencies and private-sector organizations while administering a program or service. For example, the U.S. Postal Services collects address information while delivering mail, creating an address dataset. This brief provides a definition of AD and a summary of how AD were used in the 2020 Census. The brief also introduces some key equity considerations regarding AD usage and offers potential next steps for civil rights groups.

front of the Colorado Capitol
BlogCOVID-19Op-EdJobs & Educationjulie-kerksickkali-grant

Here’s how to boost employment for people facing tough times

Eighteen months after the largest job losses in U.S. history, unemployment is still high as workers, particularly Black and Hispanic workers, continue to struggle. While some indicators suggest the economy continues to recover, that recovery is uneven and fragile. America urgently needs a solution that supports workers, employers and communities alike, without leaving anyone behind. One proven and adaptable strategy that policymakers at all levels of government can mobilize now is subsidized employment.

Trainees watch a carpenter demonstrate an electric saw
COVID-19TestimonyTax & Benefitsindivar-dutta-gupta

Ensuring Economic Security & Opportunity in Our Lifetime: America’s Pandemic Relief Response & the Path Forward

In 2020, federal policymakers took extraordinary measures to help millions of families avoid poverty and material hardship during the COVID-19 crisis. These temporary federal relief efforts—especially those boosting household incomes and ensuring people’s access to essential services—“played a central role in stabilizing our families and our nation’s economy, while pushing back on deep racial and gender inequity,” according to GCPI Co-Executive Director Indi Dutta-Gupta’s testimony before the United States House of Representatives Select Subcommittee Committee on the Coronavirus Crisis. Dutta-Gupta also argued that continuing to provide needed support to families would address pre-existing inequities and the weaknesses of social protection programs. Policies in “Build Back Better” proposals—with some crucial additions—would provide transformational investments to protect families and our economy against future threats, meet our national caregiving and job needs, and reduce poverty, hardship, and inequality for generations to come.

Indi-Dutta Gupta speaking on a panel before the House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Reform. He is speaking and gesturing with his hands.
BriefCOVID-19Jobs & Educationkali-grantjulie-kerksicknatalia-cooper

Lessons From New Hope: Updating the Social Contract for Working Families

The COVID-19 public health and economic crisis made employment more scarce and exacerbated long-standing challenges—like access to quality child care—for millions of workers, particularly workers who are Black and Brown. This brief, published in partnership with Community Advocates Public Policy Institute, shares the success story of Milwaukee’s New Hope Project—a program with a package of work-based supports that included subsidized jobs, earnings supplements, affordable health care, and child care. New Hope provides a blueprint for creating holistic, work-based approaches that significantly improve employment and family outcomes for participants and their communities, during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Two people with short hair pose in front of a house. They are wearing professional clothing and looking directly into the camera.
ReportHealth & Human ServicesTax & Benefitselisa-minoffic383@georgetown.eduvalery-martinezindivar-dutta-gupta

The Lasting Legacy of Exclusion: How the Law that Brought Us Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Excluded Immigrant Families & Institutionalized Racism in our Social Support System

In 1996, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act (PRWORA) radically transformed our system of social supports. In addition to decimating cash assistance for families, the law’s immigrant exclusions exacerbated economic and racial inequities and harmed children and families in the 25 years since. This report—published jointly with the Center for the Study of Social Policy—examines the racist roots of PRWORA’s anti-immigrant exclusions and highlights the law’s role in institutionalizing and legitimizing anti-immigrant exclusion in a range of public benefits and tax credits.

BriefCOVID-19Health & Human ServicesJobs & Educationic383@georgetown.edusophie-khan

Building the Caring Economy: Workforce Investments to Expand Access to Affordable, High-Quality Early & Long-Term Care

High-quality caregiving, including child care and long-term services and supports, is essential but out of reach for too many families. At the same time, care workers—who are disproportionately women of color—face poor job quality, low pay, and inadequate benefits, which undermines access to quality care. This brief offers recommendations for caregiving investments that promote the well-being of children, older adults, people with disabilities, and their families by creating and sustaining good jobs in the caregiving sector.

Home health aide with senior man using walker