ISABELLA CAMACHO-CRAFT

Communications Manager

Isabella Camacho-Craft is the Communications Manager at the Economic Security & Opportunity Initiative at the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality. Isabella leads the center’s communications and external relations.

Previously, Isabella worked at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, helping to develop state-level communications and advocacy campaigns to protect and strengthen health care and food assistance programs. She also worked at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, where she focused on web development and communications.

Isabella is an M.P.P. candidate at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University and received her B.A. in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. Isabella’s work takes inspiration from her family, especially her grandfather, a farmworker and organizer with the United Farm Workers of America. She loves baking pies, dancing, and hot sauce.

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BlogOp-EdHealth & Human Servicessergio-m-marxuachayan-goran

Healthcare justice for Puerto Rico

Medicaid is a core pillar of the U.S. healthcare infrastructure that helps ensure that everyone — regardless of income — can have access to quality care. But for decades, the federal government has treated Puerto Rico unequally, covering only half the share of the cost (in comparison to a maximum of 83 percent for states). And the amount of federal funding is subject to an extremely low, arbitrary and unstable cap set by Congress. The perverse result is that one of the poorest jurisdictions in the United States is treated as one of the wealthiest states for Medicaid funding — a program specifically designed to help people and families with low incomes access quality medical care.

A young girl getting a medical checkup.
BriefDemocracyjae-june-leecara-brumfieldneil-weare

Advancing Data Equity for U.S. Territories

The U.S. cannot fully understand itself as a nation and the needs of its people without timely, complete, and accurate statistics on all of its citizens and residents. However, millions of U.S. citizens and residents living in the U.S. territories are not included in many key government data collection efforts and publications. These data disparities undermine the ability of policymakers and researchers to understand national and local challenges, including the unique risks posed by the climate emergency and pervasive social and economic inequalities. This brief—published jointly with Equally American—analyzes the implications of inadequate data collection in the U.S. territories and recommends steps federal policymakers can take to improve the timeliness and accuracy of data and understand the social, environmental, and economic challenges residents of U.S. territories face.

A father leading his two daughters to the entrance of a church
ReportDemocracygwynne-evans-lomayesvajae-june-leecara-brumfield

Advancing American Indian & Alaska Native Data Equity: Representation in Federal Data Collections

The United States must improve its data collection efforts in order to ensure equitable representation of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. Inequitable data have deep and pervasive impacts on American social, political, and economic systems. The current lack of accurate, reliable, and sufficiently detailed data risks making AI/AN peoples invisible to policymakers and reinforcing existing dynamics of marginalization. This report explores the history of AI/AN data in federal data collections, describes some nuances of working with AI/AN population data, and highlights the undercounting and underrepresentation of AI/AN populations in federal data collections. It also recommends proposed changes to data collection to increase equitable representation for AI/AN populations, which must be done in consultation with Tribal Nations in accordance with tribal sovereignty.

Advancing American Indian and Alaska Native Data Equity
BlogOp-EdJobs & EducationPost-Secondary Educationlaura-tatumnatalia-cooper

How to fix segregation by college major and in the workforce

Over the past three decades, segregation across groups of majors, or fields of study, between women of color and White men has increased. This segregation threatens equal opportunity and contributes to a segregated workforce — which negatively impacts wages, job security and career mobility for millions of workers, especially women and Black and Brown people. Even as topline statistics on diversity in overall enrollment improve, higher education institutions shouldn’t miss critical opportunities to ensure that women and students of color are aware of, feel welcome in, and can participate in all fields of study. 

Three people working in a lab, looking at a computer monitor
ReportHealth & Human ServicesTax & Benefitsareeba-haiderayan-gorancara-brumfieldlaura-tatum

Re-Envisioning TANF: Toward an Anti-Racist Program That Meaningfully Serves Families

An America where no one experiences poverty is possible. Already, the U.S. has programs with the potential to make this vision a reality, including programs that provide cash assistance, like Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The current TANF program provides very little cash assistance and is marked by stark racial disparities, but it has the potential to reduce child poverty, increase economic security, and advance racial equity. This report offers a vision for an anti-racist approach to the TANF program, with new statutory goals and policy recommendations to advance racial justice.

Re-Envisioning TANF
BlogOp-EdHealth & Human Servicescara-brumfield

Why We Need #TamponsForAll

Price increases for basic necessities like tampons have a real cost. Period poverty—the lack of access to sanitary products due to financial constraints—is a public health crisis deserving of a coordinated response that profit-driven private corporations are neither motivated nor prepared to provide. We need resilient supply chains that can be relied on to get basic necessities into the hands of the people who need them—and that will surely require public investment and accountability for powerful corporations.

Three women sitting and talking on a porch
Data & WorkbooksReportHealth & Human Servicesboxcar-adminthe-childrens-partnershipcalifornia-childrens-trust

Equity Through Engagement

To advance child health equity in California, The Children’s Partnership, the California Children’s Trust, and the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality launched The Equity Through Engagement (ETE) project. This project examines opportunities to integrate community partnerships and interventions into California’s Medi-Cal financing and delivery systems to advance child health equity, including through addressing social drivers of health (SDOHs). 

Equity Through Engagement Report Cover
ChartbookData & WorkbooksJobs & EducationPost-Secondary Educationcasey-goldvaleayan-goranestela-zuzunaganathaniel-spilkaadiam-tesfaselassie

Unrepayable Debt: How Economic, Racial, & Geographic Inequality Shape the Distribution of Parent PLUS Loans

Each year, millions of parents across the U.S seek to help their children pay for higher education using the only source of federal financial aid for parents: the Parent PLUS loan program. Despite offering an additional college financing option, Parent PLUS disproportionately distributes unrepayable debt by income level, race and ethnicity, geography, and higher education sector, burdening low-income parents with immense debt. This chartbook examines key features of Parent PLUS loan borrower experiences, finding that Parent PLUS burdens parents and students from low-income households, Black families, and students attending postsecondary institutions in the South. Understanding this uneven distribution of Parent PLUS debt is vital in order for policymakers, postsecondary administrators, and advocates to redesign the program and develop a more equitable higher education financing system for parents and students.

Cover image of a parent in a kitchen reviewing bills and accounts
BriefJobs & EducationPost-Secondary Educationnatalia-cooperlaura-tatumvincent-palacios

Six Ways Predominantly White Institutions Can Interrupt Occupational Segregation

Predominately white institutions (PWIs) educate about 70% of all bachelor’s degree graduates and about half of all students of color. Students at PWIs tend to be segregated across fields of study, with women and people of color overrepresented in majors that lead to lower-paying occupations. Administrators at PWIs have a major opportunity to interrupt this segregation and promote inclusion and success of students of color in postsecondary education. This brief offers six key recommendations that administrators at PWIs can implement to reduce field of study segregation and shape a more equitable and dynamic future workforce.

Student with mask on taking notes in a classroom.
BriefData & WorkbooksReportJobs & Educationvincent-palacioslaura-tatumnatalia-coopersiddhartha-aneja

From Exclusion to Opportunity: The Role of Postsecondary Education in Labor Force Segregation & Recommendations for Action

A four-year postsecondary degree offers opportunities for a higher income and upward economic mobility. However, postsecondary education—historically inaccessible to people of color and women—also plays a key role in reproducing and amplifying societal inequities by sorting students into specialized fields of study by race and gender, contributing to a segregated labor force. This report examines the link between postsecondary field of study and labor market segregation using an original quantitative analysis. This report presents four principles and corresponding recommendations that postsecondary institutions and policymakers can use to reduce racial and gender segregation across fields of study, increase degree attainment, and ultimately, ameliorate labor market segregation.

Profile side photo of woman working on a computer