PRESS ROOM

For all press inquiries, please reach out to Isabella Camacho-Craft at ic383@georgetown.edu.


New Reports Tackle Gender and Racial Bias Embedded in the Tax Code

The tax code in America was largely written by and for a small number of powerful and wealthy white men. These laws comprise a set of hidden rules that help shape our economy in ways that exacerbate or mitigate gender and racial equality. Three new reports by the National Women’s Law Center—in partnership with the Groundwork Collaborative, the Roosevelt Institute, and the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality—investigate the many ways that our outmoded tax laws reflect the elite’s worldview, experiences, and biases at the expense of women, people of color, and low-income families and offer solutions to harness the tax code as a tool for equity.

A cynical way to make poor people disappear

The Trump administration has proposed a change in the way the federal government measures poverty. On the surface, this proposal may appear to be an innocuous, technical adjustment. It’s not. Instead, this change would dramatically reduce the number of people who qualify for vital basic assistance programs, including Medicaid, children’s health care and food assistance.

GCPI Proposes New Solutions for U.S. Mental Health and Substance Use Challenges

The report introduces a whole-family, whole-community behavioral health approach: a vision of a society that adequately supports mental health, physical health, and social and financial well-being. The report offers leaders in the health care, criminal justice, child welfare, workforce, and other systems a united policy agenda to ultimately improve health and economic opportunity.

Here’s how we can boost youth employment

Nearly 10 years into an economic recovery, young people in the United States are still struggling. Youth unemployment rates are double that of the prime-age U.S. population, and an estimated 4.6 million individuals ages 16-24 are neither in school nor working. Youth of color face disproportionately higher disconnection rates and additional barriers to school and career success. Young people are forced to navigate too many uncoordinated, underfunded systems — often on their own.