PRESS ROOM

For all press inquiries, please reach out to Isabella Camacho-Craft at ic383@georgetown.edu.


To help communities of color, Congress must extend the $600-a-week boosted unemployment benefit until the economy recovers

An overdue reckoning is sweeping America. The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and countless others have sparked a national conversation on police brutality and mass incarceration. As we grapple with these wounds, we must remember that structural racism damages these same communities every day without any damning videos, and without any guns drawn.

Numbers are in: Government can actually fix poverty

Originally posted on The Hill. Homelessness is one of the most visible and pervasive features in nearly every American city. But what most Americans don’t know is that homelessness was a far more limited problem until the 1980s. What changed? Our policies. In 1970,...

A Gender-Equitable Recovery Requires Saving the States

As we near the end of July, it is clear our overlapping health and economic crises show no sign of abating—in fact, they are on the verge of becoming much worse. Congress and the president now face crucial and urgent choices in averting a depression and creating a recovery that addresses the pain that has been disproportionately exacted on women.

Accelerating Education, Slowing Mobility

Economic mobility is little more than a myth for most people who grow up in families with low incomes. A child born in poverty in the early 1980s had single-digit chances of having a high income as an adult. If we want to simply raise incomes from one generation to the next, we’re failing. Nearly all Americans born in 1940 had incomes higher than their parents’ by the time they reached the same age, but today, only half of adults born in 1980 make more than their parents did.